Cities are fascinating because of their complexity. A city is more than just a collection of roads and buildings. It is a complex entity comprising infrastructure but also people and their complex social and economic interactions, their history and culture. A city is shaped by high-level planning decisions, but also the daily micro-level decisions of its inhabitants - where to shop, how to go to work, etc. As ever more humans live in ever greater cities there is a pressing need to understand the how cities function; how they grow and mature, and how they can fail. In the recent years advances in nonlinear dynamics and modelling and the advent of network science has led to rapid progress in the understanding of complex systems. Nevertheless modelling cities is still a considerable challenge. The Maths and the City workshop aims to bring researchers in maths, physics and engineering together who have made inroads to this challenge by the developing new approaches to modelling and data analysis. We envision that the synthesis of these and other approaches will eventually enable the development of mesoscale models of city dynamics.  

This workshop aimed to bring researchers in maths, physics and engineering together who have made inroads to this challenge by developing new approaches to modelling and data analysis. we envision that the synthesis of these and other approaches will eventually enable the development of mesoscale models of city dynamics.

Speakers included:

Rui Carvalho, Durham University

Marc Barthelemy, CEA 

Diego Rybski, PIK Potsdam 

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